Posts Tagged ‘Nutrition’

‘Biggest Loser’: Uproar as winner appears ‘too thin’ at 105 pounds

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

Rachel-Frederickson_DidYouDiet

Did You Diet?

Rachel Frederickson, 24, of Los Angeles won the Season 15 title of “The Biggest Loser” and the $250,000 grand prize, but promptly sparked criticism from viewers who say the show went too far by allowing the former competitive swimmer to diet her way down to 105 pounds.

Frederickson started the competition at 260 pounds and lost 155 pounds, or 59.62% of her body weight.

When the voice-over artist first walked on stage at the finale of NBC’s reality weight-loss TV show, she did so to oohs and ahhs. She was wearing a diaphanous silver dress that skimmed her new figure and all but signaled that victory would soon be hers.

But as she came into sharper view, it was clear that Frederickson was dramatically thinner than the last time viewers saw her, winning “The Biggest Loser” triathlon.

The cameras turned to trainers Bob Harper and Jillian Michael, who seemed to be clapping in slow motion as they looked her over, their eyes appearing to reflect surprise at her appearance. (See the third image in the photo gallery above, a TV screen grab that is making the rounds on social media.)

Frederickson came into the show with a heartbreaking backstory. She was a competitive high school swimmer who gave up a full college scholarship to follow her boyfriend to Europe. The relationship ended, and Frederickson came home full of regrets and ate to tamp down her sorrows.

She said she gained more than 100 pounds and had trouble recognizing herself in the mirror.

Earlier in the season, Frederickson said that winning the show would allow her to reclaim the champion within and embrace an empowered new future. Week after week in the weight-loss competition, she proved what a fierce competitor she was and was all but destined for a spot in the finale.

Frederickson is slated to speak to the media Wednesday morning during a conference call, and will no doubt be asked about her weight.

Regardless, the finale is sure to add fuel to the show’s critics who question the safety of the measures it uses and the ethics of grueling weight-loss regimens as entertainment.

In the meantime, many viewers have taken to Twitter to express their fears that Frederickson has become too thin, and to call on the show and the network to address concerns that the weight loss was too extreme:

Not everyone agreed, however, as some social media pundits noted that Frederickson was in it to win the game and will now be able to put a little weight back on, as many past contestants have done. Still others praised her transformation.

Debate over Frederickson’s appearance seems to have overshadowed — at least for the moment — the stellar transformations of many of the other competitors, including “American Idol” winner Ruben Studdard, who took to the stage to show off his sleek new physique and his new single. (He lost 119 pounds, or 25.76% of his body weight.)

Other top performers included David Brown and Bobby Saleem, the two finalists vying with Frederickson for the top prize. They lost 54.28% and 52.51% of their body weight, respectively, far less than Frederickson. The winner of the at-home prize was Tumi Oguntala, 41, of New York, who started the show at 319 pounds and lost 175 pounds, or 54.86% of her body weight, to end the show at 144 pounds. From latimes.

Weight loss pill turns into balloon when swallowed

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Did-You-Diet

Did You Diet?

A new pill that mimics the stomach-restricting nature of weight-loss surgery is helping some patients shed pounds in early trials, British researchers claim.

The pill, called the Obalon balloon, is a capsule containing an a balloon. As CBS News’ Alphonso Van Marsh reports, after a patient swallows the pill, surgeons inflate the balloon inside to make them feel full and eat less.

The device is not permanent though, and needs to be removed after about three months.

“This balloon will act to educate them about portion size and retrain their brain and their mindset a little,” Dr. Sally Norton, a bariatric surgeon at Spire Hospital, Bristol, told CBS News. Her hospital offers the procedure.

The pill capsule is attached to a tube that can be inflated. Once the capsule hits the stomach, the balloon gets released. A doctor can use an X-ray to find where the balloon is and inflate it with gas through the tube. After, the doctor pulls the tube out through the patient’s mouth, leaving the balloon floating in the stomach.

Up to three balloons are introduced to the stomach over the 12-week period, with placement depending on patient’s fullness and weight loss progress, according to the product website. This fills the stomach, in turn making the patient feel more full.

The device’s makers claim overweight and obese patients can lose up to 20 pounds in three months.

The treatment is not currently approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration and is not covered through the U.K.’s National Health Service (NHS). Patients in the U.K. can pay more than $3,300 if they want to get the treatment, Sky News reported. A two-balloon procedure may cost about $5,000, according to Van Marsh.

However, experts are not convinced the treatment will be a cure-all for obesity, given the balloons have to be deflated and removed after the 12 weeks are over.

“When they take the balloons out, what happens is the stomach hasn’t shrunk,” Tim Bean, a U.K.-based fitness expert, said to CBS News. “So you’re left with the same size stomach, or possibly even bigger than there was beforehand.”

Other medical options for weight loss, like the four types of bariatric surgeries, can be more invasive. Some patients undergo the Lap-band procedure. The band is an adjustable ring that wraps around the upper portion of the stomach. It can be inflated by doctors by placing a small needle into a reservoir and filling it with liquid. The more liquid, the tighter the band gets, which makes the stomach smaller and in turn limits food intake.

Other procedures include the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the most common surgery, where a doctor staples a portion of the stomach together to create a smaller pouch to limit how much food a person could eat.

There’s also the less common form of bypass called a biliopancreatic diversion with a duodenal switch, where a large portion of the stomach is removed and the remaining pouch is attached to the last segment of the small intestine.

Another procedure known as a vertical sleeve gastrectomy can also be undertaken. Patients have most of their stomach removed, and the remaining portions are joined by staples, leaving a small tube-shaped stomach that fills up quickly. From cbsnews.

5 Places to Sneak Hemp Into Your Diet

Monday, November 18th, 2013

Hemp_DidYouDiet

Did You Diet?

Hemp is on my list of top superfoods. Hemp is high in protein and healthy fats, and is very low in cholesterol and sodium. It is also a good source of zinc, and a very good source of magnesium. Hemp contains all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids necessary to maintain healthy human life. No other single plant source has the essential amino acids in such an easily digestible form, nor has the essential fatty acids in as perfect a ratio to meet human nutritional needs. Available in concentrated protein, shelled seeds, or oil, there are unlimited ways to include hemp in your everyday diet. I consume it just about every day in one form or another. Here are my top 5 ways to eat hemp:

1. Salad

Adding raw organic hemp seeds to any salad gives it a nutritional as well as flavor boost. Try my favorite Creamy Kale Salad Recipe. Also consider switching your salad oil to hemp oil instead of whatever you’re using now.

2. Smoothies

Hemp is a prime plant based protein alternative to whey, which can acidify the body and create extra strain on your kidneys. You can use concentrated hemp protein or for a creamier smoothie use the shelled hemp seeds. Here’s my favorite smoothie recipe.

3. Breakfast

Many people start their day with a bowl of heart healthy oatmeal. Sprinkle in a couple tablespoons of hemp seeds to up the nutritional value even more, and add a subtle nutty taste. You can also sprinkle hemp seeds in yogurt or any other breakfast cereal.

4. Dairy Substitute/Ice Cream/Milk

Did you know you can easily make your own raw hemp milk at home? Skip the cartons that have the questionable added carrageenan, and make your own by blending 2-3 tablespoons of raw organic hemp seeds with 4-8 ounces of water. The water to seeds ratio is for you to decide, based on if you prefer a thinner milk, or thicker cream (to replace that unhealthy half and half). Add a sprinkle of cinnamon and a few drops of liquid stevia and vanilla to bring the taste closer to a store bought brand. Make sure to blend the mixture on high for 45 seconds to a minute, preferably with a high speed blender, to fully blend the seeds for a smooth finish. If it’s still too lumpy for you, strain it through cheese cloth or a nut milk bag.You can try adding flax seeds (1/2-1 tablespoon) and even some soaked brown rice. A good rule of thumb to make a quart of milk is 1 cup hemp seeds to 4 parts water. Experiment and see what mixture and consistency you personally like. Store in a mason jar and make fresh every few days and shake it up before pouring. If you’re lucky enough to live in the vicinity of Omega Creamery’s limited distribution area like I am, you can enjoy not only their hemp milk but also their low glycemic vegan superfood ice cream!

5. Pesto

That’s right! You can make a superfood vegan pesto with hemp seeds! Here’s the recipe. I add this to gluten free pasta, use it as a pizza base instead of tomato sauce, or spread it on flax crackers.

Adding more hemp to your diet will not only improve your health, but can help create more demand for this sustainable crop which requires no fertilizers or pesticides, and help the call for (re)legalization. The hemp plant (Cannabis sativa) is one of the earliest known cultivated crops, and it has many uses including textiles, fiber, wood, plastic and fuel alternatives. And no, it won’t get you high or make you test positive for drugs, but it will make you and our precious planet a whole lot healthier. From care2.